frosé all day

 

It’s that time of year…the weather’s starting to heat up, summer is almost here, and frozen cocktails are on the brain. Or maybe it’s just that it feels necessary to celebrate the gorgeous weather and everyone’s sun-kissed/freckled skin.

Frosé crept into the scene last year and with the some recipe testing, I’ll let you know it’s very easy to make at home!

This is for the hot days, where you want to add ice cubes to your wine, or blend up a batch for a BBQ, book club, or just because. I promise the added sugar doesn’t make it sweet at all. It’s needed to balance out the tart lemon and blended wine.

FROSÉ (serves 5)

  • 1 bottle rosé
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 cup cut strawberries
  • approx. 2 lemons

Using a large freezer zip-top bag, pour entire bottle of wine into bag.  Seal bag and press extra air out (don’t want it to balloon in the freezer). **Freeze for 12 hours**

**note that this step can be omitted. When I first read a frosé recipe I skimmed over it like an idiot so when I made this video I didn’t have the 12 hour frozen bag in place.

Anyway….To make the strawberry simple syrup you’ll need to: first, cut up 1 cup of strawberries, slice, dice, whatever you want and set aside. Next, add 1/2 cup boiling water to 1/2 cup of sugar. Mix until sugar is dissolved. Place cut berries into warm sugar water and set aside to cool for about 15 minutes.

In the meantime, juice enough lemons to get yourself 2oz worth.

Set up your blender. Now, if you haven’t frozen your rosé for 12 hours, add about a tray worth of ice cubes as the base (simply omit this step if your rosé is in a semi-frozen state).

Add frozen rosé, simple syrup, strawberries and 20z lemon juice to the blender.

Start up that blender and let it whirl until frothy.

Garnish with a berry, drink, dance and be merry!

(repeat when necessary) 

PS: the wine glass I used can be found HERE 

where to find rosé

Almost like an add on to the last rosé post, because the wine is made from all different grape varietals, it can come from anywhere wine is produced. Yes Provence is reigning Queen, but there are many different wine regions that are producing something in that vein but with their own twist. Dare I say a new place will take over Provence’s rule??

What I’m aiming at, is other rosés deserve recognition. You don’t have to go Provence or bust- there are plenty of other dry, mineral forward, crisp, hint of fruit (strawberry, raspberry, white peach, etc.), delicious choices out there!

yes way rosé

And I have two in mind that you should try:

La Spinetta Casanova Rosé

the palest of pinks, this one is a true crowdpleaser from one of Italy’s best and renowned winemakers!

Arnot-Roberts Rosé

super dry and perfect for the beach, this California rosé stands up to the best of the South of France!

 

CHEERS!!!

 

how rosé is made

Like I mentioned in the video, there are four ways to produce rosé wine.

At the end of the day, what gives wine its color is THE GRAPE SKINS. And that’s why each different grape varietal produces wines with a different hue. Next time you’re out, get one glass of Pinot Noir and let’s say one glass of Cabernet Sauvignon- you’ll be able to tell right away that Pinot Noir grapes produce a lighter colored vino. Different varietal leads to different hue.

The same holds true for rosé. Red grape varietals are used to make rosé only there are 4 methods to produce the pink drink.

how rose wine is made
image via

BLENDING

This method is typical for the production of sparkling rosé especially in the Champagne region of France. Elsewhere, it’s frowned upon to make rosé in this style. A lot of countries in Europe actually ban this process, but there are low quality still rosés that are made from blending red and white wine. So to recap: high quality sparkling rosé is made from adding a little red wine to bubbly AND $*!tty/cheap rosés are made from a mix of white and red wine.

DIRECT PRESS

Direct press typically leads to the lightest colored rosés in the game. The wine only sees skin contact for a short amount of time, just when the vintner is squeezing aka pressing the grapes to make the pre-alcoholic wine juice. It is verrryyy similar to the third method, limited skin maceration, however, this method doesn’t involve letting the grape skins sit with the wine.

LIMITED SKIN MACERATION aka LIMITED SKIN CONTACT

As you can see in the lovely graphic, the longer the red grape skins sit with the juice, the darker the pink becomes. Macerating the skins also imbues the wine with a bit more structure and aromatics. So pending the amount of time the skins sit, this method can create anything from light blush rosé to a deeper full bodied rosé.

SAIGNÉE

Which means in French “bleeding” actually creates a rosé and a red wine. I used Pinot Noir as my example in the video, so again a winemaker takes pinot noir juice and then portions off a certain amount from the first time pressing the grapes. That portioned off juice is the rosé! It is a pink color because the small selection that is run off only has a short amount of time with the grape skins. We can also call this kind of rosé a byproduct because at the end of the day, more red wine is created.

See you next week where I’ll take you through a recipe to make FROSÉ, just in time for Memorial Day Weekend.

CHEERS!

the history of rosé

Leave it to the Ancient Greeks settled in the Provence region of France to invent rosé. Back in 600 B.C. the aim wasn’t necessarily to create a pink hued drink, but since the skins from the grapes were only in contact with the juice for a short period of time, the wine wasn’t able to develop a rich red color. Instead it was pink! It was probably consumed to help invent the idea of democracy, cartography, modern philosophy and most importantly the Olympics. Just conjecture, but add rosé to the list of “Things Invented by the Greeks that we Still use Today“.

Not mentioned in my video (only so much you can say in 60 seconds…

When the power shifted in the South of France, new wine making techniques were introduced and rosé wine was no longer in vogue (gasp!). It wasn’t until the 1800’s when the English caught wind of pink hued wines from Bordeaux, aka “clairet”, that rosé was back in the game. The Brits soon blew this off, however, and the trend quickly shifted. Bordeaux began exporting its bold Merlot/Cab Sauv blends which are still popular today.

rosé and the history

Back to rosé…

Flash forward to the 1970’s when Bob Trinchero, of Sutter Home Wine in Napa, accidentally created an American rosé. This “blush wine” was a result of using Zinfandel grapes (red grapes) to make a “white wine”. Say whattt?? As I mentioned in the video, the 1970’s saw a demand for white wine that exceeded red, and winemakers didn’t have the white varietals to cover their asses. Sooooo, they tried to pull as fast one. A fast one that left us seeing pink again! Thanks Bob. Although, with the “blush wines” of the 1970’s and 80’s they weren’t dry. Once this fad was over, blush wine’s sweetness and deep pink color left American’s with a bad taste in their mouth (literally). Pink wine was again given the axe (weep).

HOWEVER…

Thanks to crafty and badass winemakers, rosé is here to stay (quote me!!). They’ve brought back techniques aimed to deliver a dry, refreshing and accessible wine fit for everyone-of legal drinking age– (aka saving my ass if I do in fact get quoted). So, I’m calling it: Rosé is here to STAY! Vive la ROSÉ! (but really I just won’t let rosé’s popularity die…me, just me!) Ok maybe with the help of my good friends and The Fat Jew we won’t let this beautiful beverage see a dip in popularity.

Until next week, sip some of the good stuff!

CHEERS!

wine wednesday: valentine’s style

ROMEO + JULIET

BEY + J

ELEVEN + MIKE

NOAH + ALLIE

ROSE + JACK

SUE + DALE (my parents)

HARRY + SALLY

RACHEL + ROSS

CORY + TOPANGA

MITCHELL + CAMERON

COACH + TAMI

CLAIRE + JAMIE

PEANUT BUTTER + JELLY

WINE + ALL (ok most*) OCCASIONS

#couplegoals

It’s that time of year…when all of the CVS, Walgreens and corner stores are filled with red tinsel, metallic pink ribbons and huge bags of heart shaped candy (I like the crispy Palmer hearts FYI). But don’t fret those who are single or romantically engaged…

Yes there’s chocolates, love and lingerie but WINE- that’s the real gift that keeps on giving…handwritten cards too! Don’t forget those. Everyone’s (ok me!) a sucker for a good note.

Anywhoooo…whether you’re “celebrating” with a new lover, old flame, girlfriends, the guys or random strangers, WINE is the answer my loves. It’s a libation as old as time and has tested mannnny waters.

So grab a couple bottles and get happy! No need for tears this Tuesday (unless they’re caused from trying said delicious wine)

a classy sparkling rosé

Simply a must! My favorite right now is Contratto for England Rosé Pas Dosé.  It has delicate bubbles, a hint of sweetness you want from a rosé but finishes really clean and light.

 a giant bottle of bubbly

Not only does this bottle share my surname, but the PRICE!!! You guys it’s under $30 for a 1.5LTR of bubbly. A MAGNUM. Needless to say, I bought the bottle with no specific occasion to celebrate, but it’s vvvvvv appropriate for Valentines: everyone gets some if you’re with a group AND a power move for a power couple.

Any wine by Scribe

These guys know what they’re doing!!! I mean heck if you’re in Sonoma, take your date there and you can thank me later. Order a bottle of their Pinot Noir and you’ll be a god among your friends/lover.

la spinetta rosé

If sparkling rosé isn’t your thing- or even if you don’t think you’re a rosé drinker, I dare you to try this one. C’mon, don’t be shy! This Italian rosé drinks like a zesty mineral-y white with a kiss of strawberry. Think if a sexy one-piece clad Italian woman stepped out of the ocean and gave you a kiss…that’s this wine!

image c/o Faubourg Wines

2014 frog’s leap zinfandel

Zin’s get a bad rep these days, but this wine was one of the best surprises I tasted last year. It really wow’d me and undoubtedly will do the same for you. It’s elegant while still able to please those who like big Cabs- there’s a slight tartness from raspberry but it’s balanced out by the floral nose and notes of pepper on the palate.

frog’s leap winery in the fall…also a stellar date spot in Napa

enjoy your wine!!! be a true lover, and let me know your other Valentine’s Day go-tos. xoxo NP

*inappropriate scenarios:

-your little cousin’s first piano recital (drink AFTER because then you won’t laugh while she plays chopsticks)

-before a final interview (don’t be tempted before…it’ll taste so much better once you’re finished!)

-mile 1 of a marathon (no, just no)