how rosé is made

Like I mentioned in the video, there are four ways to produce rosé wine.

At the end of the day, what gives wine its color is THE GRAPE SKINS. And that’s why each different grape varietal produces wines with a different hue. Next time you’re out, get one glass of Pinot Noir and let’s say one glass of Cabernet Sauvignon- you’ll be able to tell right away that Pinot Noir grapes produce a lighter colored vino. Different varietal leads to different hue.

The same holds true for rosé. Red grape varietals are used to make rosé only there are 4 methods to produce the pink drink.

how rose wine is made
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BLENDING

This method is typical for the production of sparkling rosé especially in the Champagne region of France. Elsewhere, it’s frowned upon to make rosé in this style. A lot of countries in Europe actually ban this process, but there are low quality still rosés that are made from blending red and white wine. So to recap: high quality sparkling rosé is made from adding a little red wine to bubbly AND $*!tty/cheap rosés are made from a mix of white and red wine.

DIRECT PRESS

Direct press typically leads to the lightest colored rosés in the game. The wine only sees skin contact for a short amount of time, just when the vintner is squeezing aka pressing the grapes to make the pre-alcoholic wine juice. It is verrryyy similar to the third method, limited skin maceration, however, this method doesn’t involve letting the grape skins sit with the wine.

LIMITED SKIN MACERATION aka LIMITED SKIN CONTACT

As you can see in the lovely graphic, the longer the red grape skins sit with the juice, the darker the pink becomes. Macerating the skins also imbues the wine with a bit more structure and aromatics. So pending the amount of time the skins sit, this method can create anything from light blush rosé to a deeper full bodied rosé.

SAIGNÉE

Which means in French “bleeding” actually creates a rosé and a red wine. I used Pinot Noir as my example in the video, so again a winemaker takes pinot noir juice and then portions off a certain amount from the first time pressing the grapes. That portioned off juice is the rosé! It is a pink color because the small selection that is run off only has a short amount of time with the grape skins. We can also call this kind of rosé a byproduct because at the end of the day, more red wine is created.

See you next week where I’ll take you through a recipe to make FROSÉ, just in time for Memorial Day Weekend.

CHEERS!

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